Title

Desenclos' Prelude, Cadence et Finale: Harmonic Progression and Motivic Content Achieved Through Solo Voice

Type of Submission

Performance

Keywords

Music theory, Desenclos, harmony, melody, content

Abstract

There is an idiom that form and harmony can only be achieved through multiple voices. Many such examples are consistent with the piano medium. However, this idiom is challenged in Desenclos' Prelude, Cadence et Finale for alto saxophone and piano. Despite the piano accompaniment, thematic harmonic progression takes place in the saxophone part, mostly highlighted in the Cadence section. I hope to share many techniques Desenclos has used to create motivic content, whether through elements of tritone usage, pentatonic scales, or systematic intervalic relationships. For time purposes, I will be focusing on the first two sections of the piece, talking and playing interspersed.

Campus Venue

Dixon Ministry Center, Recital Hall

Location

Cedarville, OH

Start Date

4-12-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2017 2:30 PM

Streaming Media

 
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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Desenclos' Prelude.pdf (223 kB)
PowerPoint

 
Apr 12th, 2:00 PM Apr 12th, 2:30 PM

Desenclos' Prelude, Cadence et Finale: Harmonic Progression and Motivic Content Achieved Through Solo Voice

Cedarville, OH

There is an idiom that form and harmony can only be achieved through multiple voices. Many such examples are consistent with the piano medium. However, this idiom is challenged in Desenclos' Prelude, Cadence et Finale for alto saxophone and piano. Despite the piano accompaniment, thematic harmonic progression takes place in the saxophone part, mostly highlighted in the Cadence section. I hope to share many techniques Desenclos has used to create motivic content, whether through elements of tritone usage, pentatonic scales, or systematic intervalic relationships. For time purposes, I will be focusing on the first two sections of the piece, talking and playing interspersed.