Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty Publications

Title

Profiling the Activity of G Proteins in Patient-Derived Tissues by Rapid Affinity-Capture of Signal Transduction Proteins (GRASP)

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-1-2004

Journal Title

Proteomics

ISSN

1615-9853

Volume

4

Issue

3

First Page

812

Last Page

818

DOI

10.1002/pmic.200300579

PubMed ID

14997501

Abstract

The next phase in molecular medicine will require the ability to identify signal transduction events inside a cell, in the biologic context of the disease-host interface and at a given point in time. New technologies are needed to profile the activity of these signaling pathways in patient tissue rather than cultured cell lines since the tumor-host microenvironment influences the cellular proteome. We introduce such a technology, rapid affinity capture of signaling proteins (GRASP), to investigate the activity of signaling pathways from patient-derived carcinomas and benign epithelial surfaces and apply it to studying important signaling events in ovarian carcinoma. During the progression from benign ovarian epithelium to invasive carcinoma, there is loss of repression of Rho A as evidenced by its dissociation from its inhibitor, Rho Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitor (RhoGDI). GRASP is more informative than simply profiling transcript or protein levels. Furthermore, GRASP coupled with mass spectrometry allowed us to identify a protein-binding partner of RhoGDI, demonstrating the power of this technology in the discovery of potentially novel protein-protein interactions. GRASP represents an advance in the field of proteomics as it detects protein interactions present in cells as they exist in their native tissue microenvironment.

Keywords

Carcinoma, epithelium, luminescent measurements, magnesium, magnetics, mass spectrometry, ovarian neoplasms, ovary, proteome, proteomics, signal transduction

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