Title

Senior BSN Students' Perception of Satisfaction and Self-confidence after a Simulated Mock Code Experience: A Descriptive Study

Type of Submission

Podium Presentation

Keywords

Nursing, code experience

Abstract

In the current health care environment, nurses are required to provide timely and competent responses to the rapidly changing demands and explosion of knowledge. High-fidelity simulation offers unlimited opportunities to practice rare and critical events in a safe and controlled environment. Literature supports the use of simulation in acquisition of nursing knowledge and skills. However, the findings on students' perceptions of satisfaction and self-confidence after simulated experiences are inconclusive. The purpose of this descriptive study is to describe B.S.N. students' perceptions of satisfaction and self-confidence after a simulated mock code experience and to explore the relationships between students' perceptions of self-confidence and satisfaction and the demographic characteristics. A convenience sample of 50 senior B.S.N. students who were enrolled in a senior-level nursing Leadership and Management course was included in the study. The participants completed a paper-and-pencil five-point Likert scale student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning (National League tor Nursing, 2004) after the simulated mock code experience. The results indicated that students were satisfied with the mock code simulation (mean=4.49, SD=0.53) and felt confident with code situations after the simulated experience (mean=4.42, 50=0.41). No significant correlations were found between the demographic characteristics and student satisfaction and self-confidence. Independent t-tests did not reveal significant differences between satisfaction/self-confidence and past experience as healthcare providers. However, previous experience working as an EMT was found to significantly contribute to high level of self-confidence after a simulated mock code experience. The findings of this study provide insight into students' perceptions of self-confidence and satisfaction toward simulation and may facilitate faculty as they integrates simulation into nursing curriculum.

Campus Venue

Dixon Ministry Center, Room 102

Location

Cedarville, OH

Start Date

4-10-2013 3:00 PM

End Date

4-10-2013 3:30 PM

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Apr 10th, 3:00 PM Apr 10th, 3:30 PM

Senior BSN Students' Perception of Satisfaction and Self-confidence after a Simulated Mock Code Experience: A Descriptive Study

Cedarville, OH

In the current health care environment, nurses are required to provide timely and competent responses to the rapidly changing demands and explosion of knowledge. High-fidelity simulation offers unlimited opportunities to practice rare and critical events in a safe and controlled environment. Literature supports the use of simulation in acquisition of nursing knowledge and skills. However, the findings on students' perceptions of satisfaction and self-confidence after simulated experiences are inconclusive. The purpose of this descriptive study is to describe B.S.N. students' perceptions of satisfaction and self-confidence after a simulated mock code experience and to explore the relationships between students' perceptions of self-confidence and satisfaction and the demographic characteristics. A convenience sample of 50 senior B.S.N. students who were enrolled in a senior-level nursing Leadership and Management course was included in the study. The participants completed a paper-and-pencil five-point Likert scale student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning (National League tor Nursing, 2004) after the simulated mock code experience. The results indicated that students were satisfied with the mock code simulation (mean=4.49, SD=0.53) and felt confident with code situations after the simulated experience (mean=4.42, 50=0.41). No significant correlations were found between the demographic characteristics and student satisfaction and self-confidence. Independent t-tests did not reveal significant differences between satisfaction/self-confidence and past experience as healthcare providers. However, previous experience working as an EMT was found to significantly contribute to high level of self-confidence after a simulated mock code experience. The findings of this study provide insight into students' perceptions of self-confidence and satisfaction toward simulation and may facilitate faculty as they integrates simulation into nursing curriculum.