Type of Submission

Poster

Keywords

Interdisciplinary, medical education, pharmacy education, simulation, team learning

Abstract

Background: Currently, interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming widely integrated into healthcare professional education with regulating bodies including IPE as a curricular requirement. Although recent studies have concluded that students value IPE, there are a number of challenges associated with initial engagement. Many schools are unsure how to approach this interdisciplinary integration. In addition to IPE, simulation has become an important tool in the education of health professionals. As the first exercise at Wright State University involving interprofessional groups composed completely of undergraduates, interested students from the Boonshoft School of Medicine, the WSU College of Nursing and Health, and the Cedarville University School of Pharmacy collaborated to conduct a series of IPE cases in the Department of Emergency Medicine’s high-fidelity simulation lab. In order to support a continuous improvement process and identify strengths and weaknesses of the interprofessional simulation, data was collected from all participating students.

Methods: This study was approved as an exempt protocol by the University IRB. Repeat surveys were conducted on an interprofessional group of students assessing their attitudes prior to and upon completion of a series of simulations. The survey included 6 Likert scale questions and a comments section. Paired t-test and frequency analysis were utilized for each of the survey questions to determine baseline status and determine any statistically significant change from baseline.

Results: Students from all health professions demonstrated positive attitudes toward IPE and simulation training. Results from four of the survey questions demonstrated a statistically significant positive increase in differences between pre-simulation and post-simulation survey. Baseline responses indicate a strongly positive attitude towards IPE. In comparison to pre-simulation survey responses, post-simulation responses demonstrated significant increases in students’ experience and perceived value of high-fidelity healthcare clinical simulation. Additionally, there were statistically significant changes in students’ perceived value of interdisciplinary team training and its importance in the future of medical education.

Conclusion: This study found that students from all three participating health professions demonstrated overall positive baseline attitudes toward IPE that could be further enhanced through participation in simulation-based exercises. This study provides a model of one method for integrating IPE into curricula for healthcare professionals.

Campus Venue

Stevens Student Center

Location

Cedarville, OH

Start Date

4-1-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

4-1-2015 2:00 PM

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

 
Apr 1st, 11:00 AM Apr 1st, 2:00 PM

Simulation-Based Interdisciplinary Team Learning—Pilot Study

Cedarville, OH

Background: Currently, interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming widely integrated into healthcare professional education with regulating bodies including IPE as a curricular requirement. Although recent studies have concluded that students value IPE, there are a number of challenges associated with initial engagement. Many schools are unsure how to approach this interdisciplinary integration. In addition to IPE, simulation has become an important tool in the education of health professionals. As the first exercise at Wright State University involving interprofessional groups composed completely of undergraduates, interested students from the Boonshoft School of Medicine, the WSU College of Nursing and Health, and the Cedarville University School of Pharmacy collaborated to conduct a series of IPE cases in the Department of Emergency Medicine’s high-fidelity simulation lab. In order to support a continuous improvement process and identify strengths and weaknesses of the interprofessional simulation, data was collected from all participating students.

Methods: This study was approved as an exempt protocol by the University IRB. Repeat surveys were conducted on an interprofessional group of students assessing their attitudes prior to and upon completion of a series of simulations. The survey included 6 Likert scale questions and a comments section. Paired t-test and frequency analysis were utilized for each of the survey questions to determine baseline status and determine any statistically significant change from baseline.

Results: Students from all health professions demonstrated positive attitudes toward IPE and simulation training. Results from four of the survey questions demonstrated a statistically significant positive increase in differences between pre-simulation and post-simulation survey. Baseline responses indicate a strongly positive attitude towards IPE. In comparison to pre-simulation survey responses, post-simulation responses demonstrated significant increases in students’ experience and perceived value of high-fidelity healthcare clinical simulation. Additionally, there were statistically significant changes in students’ perceived value of interdisciplinary team training and its importance in the future of medical education.

Conclusion: This study found that students from all three participating health professions demonstrated overall positive baseline attitudes toward IPE that could be further enhanced through participation in simulation-based exercises. This study provides a model of one method for integrating IPE into curricula for healthcare professionals.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.