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Abstract

Twenty-four extinct isotopes are presented for consideration from the recent creation worldview. These are radioactive isotopes which have decayed to abundances below the threshold of detection, leaving measurable daughter products in the process. The isotopes have half-lives ranging from 100,000 to 100 million years, measured at today’s decay rates. They are used in current naturalistic debates over solar system origin theories, with little resolution of the problems. Three possible creationist explanations for the evidence of missing isotopes are discussed: basic errors in our understanding of nuclear physics; an original, mature creation of the extinct isotope daughter products; and accelerated nuclear decay in the past. There is an expectation of evidence in nature for this latter explanation.

Keywords

Accelerated nuclear decay, Extinct isotopes, Half-life, Isotopes, Radioactivity, Supernova

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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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