Title

Music of the Hills: The Role of Folk Music in the Appalachian Culture

Type of Submission

Podium Presentation

Keywords

Music, folk music Appalachia

Proposal

The Appalachian Mountains of the United States has long been a source of musical and social intrigue. A rich and distinct culture has flourished there, and is closely tied to their own folk music. Appalachian folk music has provided the Appalachian community with a mode of unification and communication. This unification can be seen in a variety of ways: somewhat exclusive communities, a strong sense of heritage, shared values, community gatherings—all expressed through and supported by musical traditions. Music is often the center of social life, a source of comfort and social harmony. This folk music also fosters communication in a more general sense. It has often been a means of communication to other cultures, a way of expressing the Appalachian community’s values and protests. Issues like mountaintop removal mining bring out some prime examples of such music. Research done by musicologists, first-hand accounts of Appalachians, and the folk songs themselves all demonstrate these elements of unification and communication.

Start Date

4-8-2020 1:00 PM

End Date

4-22-2020 6:00 PM

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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Apr 8th, 1:00 PM Apr 22nd, 6:00 PM

Music of the Hills: The Role of Folk Music in the Appalachian Culture

The Appalachian Mountains of the United States has long been a source of musical and social intrigue. A rich and distinct culture has flourished there, and is closely tied to their own folk music. Appalachian folk music has provided the Appalachian community with a mode of unification and communication. This unification can be seen in a variety of ways: somewhat exclusive communities, a strong sense of heritage, shared values, community gatherings—all expressed through and supported by musical traditions. Music is often the center of social life, a source of comfort and social harmony. This folk music also fosters communication in a more general sense. It has often been a means of communication to other cultures, a way of expressing the Appalachian community’s values and protests. Issues like mountaintop removal mining bring out some prime examples of such music. Research done by musicologists, first-hand accounts of Appalachians, and the folk songs themselves all demonstrate these elements of unification and communication.